Do You Have to Squint To See Your Supply Chain? Two new studies note that "visibility" is a major concern for most organizations. ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 

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Your Inspiration For February 24

AHS

Supply Chain Visibility is Far from 20/20
for Most Organizations

If you find yourself squinting to read labels or street signs, then it’s probably time for a new pair of glasses or contact lenses. Likewise, it sounds like it is time for a visit to the optometrist for most supply chain organizations.

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Make Way, Chevrolet: Food, Other Sectors Now Dominate Robot Orders

Since the first industrial robot was installed at a General Motors plant in 1959, carmakers have dominated the use of these automated tools. That all changed in 2020. 

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How to Turn Supply Chain Sustainability into a ‘Habit’

Pandemic-related disruption put the supply chain on the radar of both business executives and consumers in 2020. Environmental concerns are likely to keep it on the radar long after COVID-19 has been controlled.

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Google Helps J.B. Hunt Improve Logistics

Similarly to how you might find new information in your daily life, you apparently can beef up your logistics operation the same way: You can Google it. (Photo: J.B. Hunt)

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By the Numbers

89%

Most companies (89%) say end-to-end supply chain visibility is important. Yet, according to Cleo Integration Cloud, "only about half of companies surveyed said they can use their data to foresee changes to their transportation plans (48%) or delivery schedules (47%), and just over one-third (37%) can see real-time changes to pricing."

Quote/Unquote:

"Companies at the helm of fashion supply chains should take stock of their recent commercial activities and decision-making, and act to address ongoing harm to workers in supply chains. For instance, by canceling orders for goods already produced, many companies have left suppliers unable to meet payroll, leading to mass layoffs."

Genevieve LeBaron, co-chair of the Yale University Modern Slavery Working Group, and Penelope Kyritsis, director of strategic research at the Worker Rights Consortium. They recently blogged a warning that "without action, modern slavery will surge in supply chains." (The Globe and Mail

Innovator in Action

How Two UPS Business Units Kept Things Moving During a Chaotic Year

When it comes to freight forwarding and customs brokerage experience, you could say UPS has been around the block. In fact, it’s been around the world — innumerable times.

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Viewpoint

How Digital Transformation and Automation Help Guard Against Disruptions

Global e-commerce sales are expected to reach nearly $5 trillion this year. Needless to say, that growth is having a major impact on supply chains, making efficient operation even more important.

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Watch This

What’s All This About the Resilient Supply Chain?

The Association for Supply Chain Management and Economist Intelligence Unit reveal their new study: "The Resilient Supply Chain Benchmark: Ready for Anything? Turbulence and the Resilience Imperative." 

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